Audiovisual Presentations

280 A laboratory for the early identification of giftedness

Larisa Kalinina
Samara State University of Social Sciences and Education
Russia

Dmitry Ivanov
Samara State University of Social Sciences and Education
Russia

Nikolai Nikitin
Samara State University of Social Sciences and Education
Russia

A description of a laboratory designed to identify the giftedness of six-year-olds is presented. The materials are the result of an analysis of scientific papers and empirical experience. The laboratory is unique in its special approach to research: SAHTM (Science, Art, Humanities, Technology, Mathematics). The possibility that gifted behavior has a biological basis and that children and adult authors may learn about the world through artistic experiments is considered.
 

 

135 A self-coaching app for career choice: Development and application

Tillmann Grüneberg
University of Leipzig
Germany

The pandemic showed how important it is to provide students with digital options for career orientation. This audio-visual presentation traces the process of creating a ten-step career orientation program based on career choice and gifted research, as well as counseling and workshop practice (cf. Grüneberg 2019). The presentation will explain the structure (project management tools, steps, and tasks, profile) of the app DEEP! (published March 2021) and present its specific tools (e.g. self-reflection questions, 360-degree feedback, etc.). The presentation includes initial user feedback and will also cover the limits of self-coaching, as well as its use in gifted counseling.
 

 

183 A study on the measurement factors of metacognitive strategy

Eun Ju Choi
Soongsil University
South Korea

Kyunghwa Lee
Soongsil University
South Korea

The purpose of this study was to deduce the components of metacognitive strategy. In previous studies and various literature, metacognitive strategy was defined as a method to help utilize metacognition effectively. Its components were divided into five domains and sub-factors were identified. The components of metacognitive strategy are the pre-prepared and planning domain, the task/text orientation domain, the composition and structuring domain, the execution domain, and the monitoring and evaluation domain. The sub-factors are comprehending, analyzing, elaboration, summarizing, defining the goals and sub-goals, global/local planning, connections of knowledge, summarizing, clarifying and predicting, monitoring, evaluating, and reflecting the solution. In this study, the concept and constituent factors of metacognitive strategy will be shared and measurement tests will be developed and utilized in curriculum and programs for gifted students.
 

 

82 A toolkit for teacher recognition of underachieving gifted students: An intervention study with Victorian teachers

Kerri Lyons
Victoria University
Australia

Underachievement by gifted students is an area of concern. It has been estimated that up to 42,500 gifted students are underachieving in Victoria, Australia, alone. A researcher-generated identification toolkit was given to 11 teachers participating in the research, along with a professional learning introduction to the toolkit. Participants also completed a pre- and post-survey to identify their knowledge prior to and post-use of the toolkit intervention. Interviews were also conducted. Findings indicated an increase in teachers’ ability to identify giftedness and underachieving gifted students through use of the toolkit, but also differing views and limited expertise.
 

 

186 Affective dimensions of STEM education for gifted students: The case for an empathy map

Wing-Leung Yeung
Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

Oi-Lam Ng
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong

Ho-Seen Christie So
Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

Ching-Man Tracy Kwok
Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

This study reports on the design and implementation of a STEM enrichment program infused with affective elements. Specifically, it features a design-thinking approach to developing solutions to a self-selected problem addressing the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Thirty secondary school gifted students enrolled in the pilot study. Assuming empathy to be a core value of the design-thinking process and aligned with affective dimensions of thinking and learning, we investigate students’ design-thinking development and STEM learning processes while implementing an empathy map as a pedagogical tool. We discuss our implications and insights for offering humanistic perspectives of STEM curricular design, especially for gifted students.
 

 

188 Beyond just a CV: Good practice sharing in a personal and career development program for gifted students

Hoi-Ying, Iris Kung
The Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

Ho-Seen, Christie So
The Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

Ching-Man, Tracy Kwok
The Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

Gifted students are often eager and have a high ability to learn, resulting in excellent performance and achievements in various fields. However, when it comes to making decisions about future study or career plans, they often encounter difficulties in choosing among many options. The Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education has launched a pilot program named Aspirations: CV Challengers, which aims to help high school gifted students understand themselves and better prepare for immediate and future learning and career aspirations. Students were able to explore future career goals through discussions, job searching, mock interviews, personal profiling, self-reflection activities, and more. Unlike many CV-writing workshops, affective elements were infused in the program. According to student feedback, the intended affective learning outcomes were well-achieved by the students. In this session, some findings and strategies will be presented and discussed.
 

 

360 Bibliotherapy through a Gifted Lens

Jervaise Pileggi
Woodland Park School District
United States

This presentation is a review of the literature around clinical and developmental bibliotherapy through the lens of socioemotional needs and the development of gifted individuals. This session will share the differences between clinical and developmental bibliotherapy and how it is used by gifted individuals and different domains, such as coping mechanisms and understanding self and environment.
 

 

22 Character development of gifted and talented children

Kubra Kirca Demirbaga
Durham University
United Kingdom

This study explores the views of teachers about the character development of gifted and talented students in Turkey. This mixed methods research uses a critical realist approach, unusual in the field, outlining stratified ontology and uncovering causal mechanisms. By examining the powers and liabilities of macro-, meso-, and micro-level entities concerning the data, and employing the three-stage critical realist methodology of identification of demi-regularities, abduction, and retroduction, the gifted and talented label ideology was found to be the causal mechanism shaping teachers’ views at the empirical layer.
 

 

235 Conceptual literacy units for gifted boys

Julia Wilson
Sydney Grammar School
Australia

“They keep me on my toes!” Do you ever say that to yourself? Do you ever say that to a colleague? You’re not alone. It’s one of the magical things about teaching in gifted education — there’s never a dull moment! Planning, creating, and implementing engaging and innovative programs isn’t easy. However, it’s essential. In this presentation, I will share examples of conceptual literacy units that stimulate highly able and gifted learners, with a focus on primary-age gifted boys. It will be practical and relevant, with big ideas, key questions, real-life connections, and “hooks” and ideas that you can implement in your classroom tomorrow.
 

 

160 Droppin’ the “G”: Transitioning from gifted and talented to an Academic Talent Development (ATD) program

Sarah Bond
The Southport School
Australia

Jasna Poeszus
The Southport School
Australia

The Southport School is committed to research-based practice. Gagné (2015) suggests we should “substitute the labels of ‘gifted children’ and ‘gifted education’ for the more relevant terms ‘talentee,’ ‘academically talented,’ and ‘academic talent development.'” Aligned to this model, our Academic Talent Development (ATD) program identification matrix reflects a distinct academic focus. Considerations include nomination (parent-, teacher-, and self-), ability (using the Cognitive Abilities Test – CAT4), achievement (using above-level Progressive Achievement Tests – PATs), gifted characteristics, and prior performance (grades). This session will provide a brief overview of our program philosophy, research base, and identification processes.
 

 

372 Educational model for teaching all students in public education schools, including gifted and talented students, suitable for every teacher everywhere

Mohammad Rawas
Ministry of Education
Saudi Arabia

This presentation aims to present a proposed educational model to teach all students in public education schools, including gifted and talented students, to suit every teacher everywhere. The model answers the main question, “What are the basic methods to support all students, including gifted ones, to meet their needs in public schools?” The following three questions stem from the main question: Question 1: in what ways can the learner’s strengths be documented to support meeting his or her needs within the regular classroom? Question 2: what appointments can be made to make educational decisions appropriate to the needs of the student to develop the overall performance? Question 3: what are the appropriate methods for the development of performance for all students, including the talented and those with outstanding performance?
 

 

233 Enhancing emotional control and communication skills of intellectual-gifted students via literature education in the first language

Li Weng
Beijing No.8 High School
China

Compared to other children, intellectually gifted children may show weaker capacity in emotional control and social communication skills. They could misunderstand others, which could affect their emotional management and social interaction performance. Using literature from the student’s first language can help them understand semantic implications, customary behaviors, and basic rules of the adult world. We have made three teaching attempts. First, through students’ feedback, teachers discover and accumulate students’ blind spots in semantic cognition; Second, guiding students to compare their own understanding with the author’s intentions. Finally, parent’s reading to children can help students discover the concerns of adults and behavioral norms in the adult world. The research results showed that the three teaching methods can improve students’ ability to correctly understand the ideas of others, thereby effectively improving the emotional management and social interaction performance of intellectually gifted children.
 

 

268 Game-based screening of gifted children’s abilities

Šárka Portešová
Masaryk University
Czechia

Michal Jabůrek
Masaryk University
Czechia

Ondřej Straka
Masaryk University
Czechia

This presentation will discuss an online, game-based assessment system for the identification of gifted children. Each test is presented as an easy-to-understand video game and includes gamified features, such as a narrative, comics, sounds, points, and many more. Currently, five games measuring five different abilities (quantitative, deductive and inductive reasoning, associative memory, and mathematical knowledge and achievement) are available. The system records additional variables for each item, such as completion times, solution changes, etc. Consequently, the problem-solving strategies of any student can be analyzed in detail. When the game is completed, a report for parents and teachers is automatically generated. Thus, a school can use the results to conduct a follow-up assessment or adapt the individual educational plan of a student. All games underwent multiple validation studies and each normative sample consisted of more than 1,000 students.
 

 

296 Gifted students at Faculties of Teacher Education

Jasna Arrigoni
Faculty of Teacher Education University of Rijeka
Croatia

Danijela Blanuša Trošelj
Faculty of Teacher Education University of Rijeka
Croatia

Potentially gifted children and young people differ from their peers in their way of learning and social-emotional characteristics. Monitoring their progress aims to create the conditions for a potentially gifted young person to become a gifted adult and thus contribute to community development. However, insights into the relevant scientific sources reveal that, with the completion of secondary education and the transition to higher education, significant scientific interests but also the support gifted students receive in practice cease. Therefore, this research aims to investigate university instructors’ opinions on the discovery, ways of encouraging, use of teaching strategies, and open questions about their previous experiences. The obtained results contribute to the change of educational policies of institutions and universities as a whole and the strengthening of resources for the support of gifted students.
 

 

247 Identification of underrepresented populations for gifted programs

Mashael Alhibs
King Saud University
United States

The identification of English-language learners (ELL) for gifted programs is a persistent issue and one of the biggest concerns in the field of gifted education. The number of ELL students is increasing, but the representation of these students in gifted and talented programming remains disproportionate. Educators have researched and discussed several approaches to identify gifted students who come from groups that have consistently been underrepresented for gifted programs in America. Three highly interrelated approaches have been the focus of recent research and will be the central point of this presentation: local norms, nonverbal ability tests, and teacher rating scales.
 

 

236 Interdisciplinary perspective on giftedness: a state-of-being heightened aware.

Truus Van der Kaaij
affiliation: Radboud University Nijmegen The Netherlands
Netherlands

In both ‘Trait’- and recent ‘Non-Trait’- perspectives on giftedness, a philosophical analysis is missing that accounts for an explanation of giftedness. Interdisciplinarity (philosophy and psychology) provides a holistic view-of-man (body, psyche, divinity), allowing a third perspective, the ‘State-of-being’ determined by a gliding scale of awareness. Neuropsychologist Solms (2018) ‘moved’ awareness, a form of homeostasis, from the generally conceived cortio-centric approach to affect (sensitivity), generated in the upper brain stem: we are not aware, unless felt. Awareness, the ability to feel things (Harari, 2020), is broader than intelligence. This study contributes to an explanation of ‘the typical problems’ of the gifted.
 

 

195 Nurturing giftedness through drama on Zoom in a pandemic

Celene Chang

Hong Kong

Can drama education be used to develop talent, even when it is delivered through Zoom? There were 66 seventh-grade students in a local school, where English is an Additional Language, who participated in a year-long program to write and perform an original script on stage. The pandemic brought an end to face-to-face classes. Drama education, which had been highly interactive and physical, had to adapt. In this presentation, we share teaching practices that can help students to continue to develop their giftedness and demonstrate Renzulli’s Three-Ring Conception of Giftedness, even with the constraints imposed by the pandemic.
 

 

140 Online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic: Perspectives from Hong Kong gifted students

Angela Siu
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong

This study examined how students perceived the experience of online learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 424 gifted students completed a short questionnaire and two open-ended questions on their views about online learning. Results indicated that students viewed online learning as time-saving, convenient, and flexible, with students in upper grades placing a stronger emphasis on these attributes than those from lower grades. Qualitative analysis suggested that students faced many challenges in their learning, including limited communication and interaction with teachers and peers, difficulty in focusing on and engaging in online classes, and extensive screen time.
 

 

239 Perceptions of economically challenged families regarding giftedness and family involvement: A literature review

Jennifer Lemoine
University of Denver
United States

This presentation will present an overview of the current literature about the underrepresentation of economically disadvantaged students in gifted education. It will include subtopics on economic disadvantage and cognitive, social, and language development; the impact of poverty on academic achievement; the impact of poverty on gifted identification; the school’s role in supporting students with an economic disadvantage; and the role of family involvement.
 

 

112 Pre-service education professionals’ knowledge of twice-exceptionality

Eric Field
Belin-Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development
United States

Research efforts have used the Twice-Exceptional Needs Assessment Survey (Foley-Nicpon, Assouline, & Colangelo, 2013), as well as its recent Australian replication (Wormald & Bannister-Tyrell, 2021), to measure what teachers and other education professionals know about working with twice-exceptional students. However, there has not been a strong focus on what pre-service education professionals know about working with twice-exceptional students. This research will survey a broad sample of pre-service education professions in the United States to evaluate what pre-service teachers are learning about how to educate twice-exceptional students.
 

 

3 Preparing school leaders to meet the needs of gifted students: Case studies of differently performing schools

Abdullah Almalky
Ministry of Education
Saudi Arabia

The role of school principals is essential and critical to the success of inclusive educational programs, including those provided for gifted students (Garner & Forbes, 2013; Inglesby, 2014). However, this role represents an intersection between special education, general education, and educational leadership (Lashley & Boscardin, 2003). Many countries that have had modern school systems for a long time have succeeded in integrating gifted education services into the school formulation. However, in Arab and Gulf countries, where a modern school system has not been in place for very long (often for just a few decades), gifted students face more challenges.
 

 

194 Promoting active learning by connecting passionate learners Through STEM Club, STEAM Club, Creative Club, and Global Club

Ho-Seen Christie So
The Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

Tsz-Yan Kathy Cheung
The Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

Hok-Ling Cheung
The Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

Hoi-Ying Kung
The Hong Kong Academy for Gifted Education
Hong Kong

A series of community-based learning programs was piloted to engage gifted students who had immense interests in STEM, creativity, and global and local issues. The programs adapted active and collaborative learning for cognitive and affective outcomes in different themes and domains. From an institutional learner survey, it was found that gifted students were keen on having more interaction with their peers. An inventive mindset and capability were nurtured along with a range of instructional strategies to encourage self and peer learning, self-initiation, collaboration, and compassion for oneself and others. The experience of deploying these strategies will be presented and discussed.
 

 

40 Socioeconomic and sociocultural status as the determinants of access to the Center for Science and Arts

Fatih Dereli
Trakya University
Turkey

This study aims to examine the socioeconomic and sociocultural structures of gifted and talented students and their families at the Center for Science and Arts (BILSEM). The participant group of this research will be the families of 57,360 gifted and talented students studying at the BILSEM. Participants (approximately 1,000 families) will be selected by simple random sampling. To collect data, an e-form prepared via Microsoft Forms will be sent to the participants. In the form prepared by the researcher, there are a total of 30 questions aimed at determining the socioeconomic and sociocultural characteristics of the families and their children.
 

 

87 Student teachers’ implicit attitudes toward gifted students in Germany

Sandra Klaubert
University of Erfurt
Germany

The purpose of the presentation is to provide insights into the development of a Single-Category Implicit Association Test (SC-IAT) assessing the implicit attitudes of student teachers in Germany toward gifted and talented students. The author will show the results of pre-studies that have already been conducted by briefly explaining the dualism of attitudes and their meaning, especially for teacher education.
 

 

15 Support education room and advanced history education for superior and talented students

Serife Bektas
Munzur Üniversitesi
Turkey

A study of historical thinking was conducted in Turkey, assessing learning in the two main schools in education for gifted and talented children. The two schools are the BILSEM (Science and Art Center) and the supportive education rooms which use acceleration and enrichment. The study included observations using Egan’s historical thinking stages of 185 gifted students. The students were taught courses in advanced history and the philosophy of history. At the conclusion of the course, each student was required to submit an academic essay as the outcome of the course. This session will report on this study.
 

 

290 Talented girls to eminent visual artists: The influence of childhood and adolescence on artistic creativity

Katrina Ginis
Monash University
Australia

Sandra Stewart*
Monash Unveristy
Australia

Leonie Kronborg
Monash University
Australia

The development of talents and exceptional capacities can be significantly influenced by experiences during childhood and adolescence. This qualitative research explored the interaction of potential abilities and early life experiences, including environmental enrichment and education, on the creative development of ten eminent female Australian visual artists. This investigation contributes to psychological understandings of how creativity and artistic talent evolve and can be fostered to enable the realization of creative potential. The findings, including facilitative factors and sensitive developmental periods that were evident, have implications for educating, supporting, and empowering current and emerging female artists to excel for the benefit of society.
 

 

95 The Collaborative Gifted Program

Ayesha Umar
Ayesha Umar-Careers and Education Consultancy
Australia

The Collaborative Gifted Program is a first-of-its-kind program designed and delivered at a government primary school in Australia. The school was a finalist for the Victorian Education Award for Outstanding Provision for High-Ability Students in 2020. It is a talent development program based on developing collaboration among stakeholders to nurture gifted students. It draws on the concept of family engagement in education and flourishes on teacher-parent coordination or home-school relationships. Three separate training sessions are held every term for gifted students, teachers, and parents.
 

 

363 The effects of secondary school teacher wellbeing on creativity-fostering teacher behaviors: Emotional intelligence as mediator

Farida Kurniawati
Universitas Indonesia
Indonesia

Shahnaz Safitri
Universitas Indonesia
Indonesia

Creativity is an essential skill in the 21st century, yet according to Global Creativity Index, Indonesian students do not possess it. This finding leads to the question of whether these students are encouraged to think creatively. Since the teaching profession is stressful and has high administrative workloads, we aim to explore whether teachers’ wellbeing predicted creativity-fostering teacher behavior (CFTB) in learning, and whether emotional intelligence (EI) moderates the potential impact of teacher wellbeing on CFTB. The data gathered through an online questionnaire from 302 secondary teachers (69.8% female; M-age= 40.08) showed that EI moderated the relationship between teacher wellbeing and CFTB.
 

 

299 The history of gifted education in the United States

Anna Armitage

United States

The history of gifted education in the United States is a topic rarely discussed for its practical import to the field, but it provides understanding and context for many of the challenges in gifted education today. Issues of equity and diversity in gifted education began at the field’s inception, while many of the ways to support gifted learners have been agreed upon for nearly 100 years. The history of gifted education must be understood if we are to support the goals of equitable and appropriate gifted education in the 21st century.
 

 

307 The influence of a creative classroom atmosphere on the creativity of gifted children: An experimental study

Li Cheng

China

Xiaowei Zhang

China

Lihong Wang

China

A creative classroom climate has an impact on the creativity of gifted children, but there is still not enough empirical evidence to support this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to compare the creativity level of gifted children in different educational settings (a creative classroom atmosphere vs. a traditional classroom atmosphere). Creativity was rated by the level of decision-making in the activity, with both fluency and originality scores. The results reveal that gifted children in the creative classroom atmosphere scored higher on creativity than those in the traditional classroom atmosphere. The finding may provide guidelines for the construction of a classroom environment for gifted children’s education.
 

 

208 The role of parental support in the development of gifted dancers

Maria Aleksandrovich
Pomeranian University
Poland

This presentation will address the question of how families can support gifted dancers. The study is based on the theoretical ideas of Jung (1979), who wrote that the education of gifted and talented children makes considerable demands on the psychological, intellectual, moral, and artistic susceptibilities of the educator; and of Strelau (2004), who underlined the importance of nearest surrounding for talent development. During the presentation, the above-mentioned ideas will be discussed and the results of empirical studies conducted in Poland, Belarus, and Russia of ballet dancers’ parental support will be reported.
 

 

60 The transnational mobility of gifted and talented people

Alberto Abad
Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora – UFJF (Brasil)
Brazil

The 21st century is showing a global increase in international migration, including the transnational mobility of gifted and talented people. However, there is little research on gifted and talented people’s transnational mobility in the psychology of migration. This study aims to describe the transnational mobility process of gifted and talented Latin American people and analyze the individual, cultural, and social aspects and personal expectations of transnational mobility with talent development. The technical-empirical instruments consist of a demographic characterization questionnaire in Portuguese, Spanish, and English and a semi-structured interview script.
 

 

261 Twice-exceptional identification and identity formation

Robin Tobin
Denver Public Schools & University of Denver
United States

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships among the age of twice-exceptional identification, order of identification (which exceptionality was first), and academic performance within the theoretical framework of Identity Formation.
 

 

297 Views of psychological counselors and guidance counselors about the career development of gifted students

Nüket Afat
İstanbul Sabahattin Zaim University
Turkey

The aim of the study is to examine the views of psychological counselors and guidance counselors about the career development of gifted students. This study used a qualitative research method and a case study design. The working group is 42 psychological counselors and guidance candidates at a foundation university in Istanbul. Within the scope of the research, the questions “Which career choices do gifted individuals prefer?” and “What are the effects of the career choices of gifted individuals?” were posed. The content analysis method of the data will determine possible sub-themes and gather them under various themes according to the distribution of the opinions of the participants.
 

 

142 Virtual reality and creativity

Robert Kelemen
Varazdin County
Croatia

Lianne Hoogeveen
Radboud University Nijmegen
Netherlands

Marjolijn van Weerdenburg
Radboud University Nijmegen
Netherlands

This submission reports on the findings of a systematic literature review on virtual and augmented reality and creativity in educational settings. The research investigates the implementation of virtual and augmented reality and virtual worlds for teaching creativity. The submission also makes connections between models of creativity and virtual worlds, as supported by the findings of the research.
 

 

85 Whose rights and duties? Conflicts between teachers and parents of gifted children

Nava Ben Artzey
Ono Academic College
Israel

Fulfilling the needs of a gifted child in a mixed-ability classroom can be a source of tension between parents and teachers. This study applied theoretical and practical tools to describe factors that inhibit the parent-teacher relationship. It draws on Positioning Theory to understand strategies used by parents with teachers. In-depth interviews using a qualitative research design were conducted with 40 parents from Israel. Speech act analysis and Bamberg’s proposal were implemented, and three types of strategies were identified: Law Enforcers, Motivators, and Mentors. For each type, parents attribute different rights and duties to themselves and to the teachers. These findings indicate that it is not a lack of knowledge or the impact of decentralization on school decision-making that inhibits parent-teacher collaboration. The analysis also reveals the interaction between the psychological and behavioral aspects of parents; these are not necessarily congruent.
 

 

123 Younger gifted voices: Self-reflection and creativity designing the future of education

Carolyn Giles
Born to Soar
Australia

Lost between discussion of the compliant and the disruptive gifted child is the recognition of the child’s need to seek a personalized learning journey. The Enterpotens Program was designed to act as a circuit breaker to prevent developing traits of underachievement from becoming established practices. The program aims to enable parents to step back from their role as advocators and enable young, gifted children to develop skills as communicators of their learning needs. By filtering their reflective thoughts through their personal lens of creativity, children can become the designers of their own learning. Elements of this program will be shared to encourage thoughtful deliberation.
 

 
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